News & Events

December 5, 2017

Vince and MoreNew technology — created by Profs Robert Vince and Swati More from the Center for Drug Design — uses a camera to collect images of light interacting with the retina, which can show the early presence of Alzheimer’s Disease.

September 27, 2017

vince-patterson-nagasawaThe Twin Cities Business Magazine discusses the cyanide antidote invented by Profs. Vince, Patterson, and Nagasawa. The USPTO has issued a new patent to the U of M Rege

June 27, 2017

Christine SalomonThe fungal disease called white-nose syndrome has killed millions of bats since it was first discovered in North America 10 years ago, but University of Minnesota scientist Christine Salomon hopes to find a treatment deep in the cold damp shafts of the Soudan Mine.

May 3, 2017

The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources first discovered White Nose Syndrome in Minnesota last year, and the disease continues to spread west. Professor Christine Salomon is a part of the team helping raise awareness about the state of bats in Minnesota. “One of the most important things we can do is protect habitat and build a new habitat for bats,” Salomon said. Watch the video

April 14, 2017

Bob Vince NY State Emblem

The New York State Senate recently adopted a legislative resolution commending Prof. Robert Vince upon the occasion of his designation as a 2017 Inductee into the Auburn Alumni Hall of Distinction. 

March 8, 2017

Vince and MoreProf Swati More, and Prof Robert Vince (Director of the Center for Drug Design), have discovered a potential new drug that works as an antidote to acetaminophen poisoning. It’s named ψ-Glutathione (Pseudo-Glutathione), similar to the naturally-occurring compound&n

June 23, 2016

Researchers at the Center for Drug Design, Profs. Robert Vince, Swati More and Dr. James Beach, have devised a new concept that may allow detection of Alzheimer's disease at an early stage — early enough to give drugs a chance to work! For the first time, changes associated with early stages of the diseases were detected in live mice through color-shifts in the light reflected by the retina. This success, from work with mice predisposed to Alzheimer’s disease, paves a way for a human trial to further test this technique.

April 21, 2016

Prof Robert Vince has been awarded the Antonin Holy Memorial Award from the International Society for Antiviral Research (ISAR). PDF

Bob Vince

 

March 30, 2016

How life in the Soudan Mine could save the Midwest bat population
Researchers from the University of Minnesota Center for Drug Design are getting closer to finding a solution to the problem of White Nose Syndrome affecting bat populations throughout the country. For the past six years, Christine Salomon, PhD, and her colleagues have been researching microorganisms living deep in the Soudan Mine in northeast Minnesota.

June 29, 2015

Life Saver: Robert Vince, a Minnesota superhero, creates drugs to combat diseases like AIDS and cancer. How many millions of lives has Dr. Robert Vince saved? It’s hard to put an exact number on it, but millions certainly, if not a good deal more. Vince invents drugs, and before he invented the anti-viral drug Ziagen, now known by its generic name abacavir, HIV/AIDS was a fast death sentence. Ziagen was the first drug specifically designed to combat AIDS that worked.

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